Nicholas Black Elk 5/2 @ 5pm

The Life and Legacy of Nicholas Black Elk, Holy Man of the Lakota

Join Damian Costello, the Friends of the Jackson Library, and New Hampshire Humanities to explore the life and legacy of Nicholas Black Elk (c.1866-1950), the Lakota holy man made famous by the book Black Elk Speaks.

We will begin with Black Elk's Great Vision and his struggle to discern his calling during the events of the Great Sioux War. During his long life, Black Elk lived out his vision in three overlapping roles: as a traditional healer, a Catholic teacher, and a revivalist of Indigenous traditions. In the midst of great tragedy, Black Elk wove these three strands into one beautiful life exemplifying survival, hope, and reconciliation.

We will discuss the relevance of Black Elk's legacy for broader questions of Abenaki survival in Northern New England, hope in the face of global environmental problems, and reconciliation in the midst of growing political and religious sectarianism. This talk is based on extensive historical research, extended residency in Indian Country, and continuing conversation with Lakota elders.

Introduction to Chess 5/16 @ 3pm

This program is for anyone interested in learning about chess including kids, parents, and teachers.  If you are a complete beginner or haven't played in a long time and need a refresher, this would be a great place to start.  You'll learn about the fundamentals of chess (the chess board, pieces, and setup), the rules, some basic strategies, and how to improve your chess skills going forward.

Register to receive the Zoom link.

The Tough Times are killing me

This painting is one of my favorites, and the author has local ties… anyone recognize the name?

After investing some time troubleshooting for and communicating with the team at the Museum of Bad Art, our libraries have decided to cancel the formally postponed event Living in Tough Times: From Having a Bad Day to Dystopian Apocalypse.

It was lovely to see so many familiar Jackson faces on the Zoom meeting even if I was melting into the floorboards. I know we were all looking forward to a belly laugh so please accept apologies from all parties.  We are working on other awesome programs throughout the spring.

Friends Annual Appeal

Dear Friends of the Library,

The Library is open.

I write to you, as my predecessor Allen Brooks did during last year’s highly successful annual appeal, to ask for your continued support of our library.

As we move patiently toward the day when the building is fully open, the financial support we provide will be important, perhaps more important than it has been in the past. Without our gifts the Library would be unable to provide all the services we have depended upon.

Your donations purchase new books, office and bathroom supplies, electronic media, and fund monthly events and children’s programs, and can fund further improvements to our contact-free services. Jackson tax dollars keep the lights on, the building maintained, and our hard-working staff paid, but most everything else depends on your gifts! We hope your generosity will continue.

Money, important as it is, has not been the only thing that helps the Library maintain its vital role in our community. In the past volunteers have taken on a variety of important tasks, including shelving returned books and media, deep cleaning, and organizing. Our staff has taken on these tasks as well as their normal workload. There are still opportunities for volunteers outside the building: transporting materials between libraries in the Northern New Hampshire Library Collaborative; and creating flyers and posters for outreach to the community, I hope that in the months ahead more of us will volunteer. If the pandemic has taught us anything it is the importance of community and community institutions like our library.

One of the most public ways that the Friends have raised money has been our used book sale at the Whitney Center Memorial Day weekend. We did not hold that sale in the past two years. We hope to return to the Whitney Center for a sale in the spring. Our fall used book collection days were successful and we plan to have more in the early spring.

The Friends has a board of directors, with three regular meetings a year. All our friends, be they full or part-time area residents, are invited to attend and participate in our discussions of how we can become even stronger supporters of our library. Our next meeting is Wednesday, January 13, 2020, at 9 a.m. in the library. Our meetings rarely last more than an hour, so please join us.

With your monetary and volunteer help, we look forward to another great year at our library.

Thank you.

Yours truly,

Daniel Weir, President
Friends of the Jackson Public Library

This year we again offer online giving.

Book donations

The Friends of the Jackson Public Library will once again be accepting book donations for a book sale sometime in the spring.

Please drop off your gently used books at the old town garage (next to Flossie’s General Store) on the first Saturday of the month between 9:00-11:00.  If you are unable to make this time, call Melinda Marsello at 401-824-6924 to arrange pick up.

The sale will once again be in the Whitney Community Center and we are hoping it will be a successful fund raiser for the library.

Please remember books should be in good condition and no:  text books, encyclopedias, foreign language or periodicals.

‘All Eyes Are Upon Us,’ a Zoom event on October 8th

COVID closures and Zoom conferences can be tricky, but they can also offer us new opportunities. One of those is a chance for us to partner with the libraries of Cook Memorial in Tamworth, Conway, Freedom, Madison, as well as the NH Humanities to bring you an exciting event relevant to our particular place in time and geography.

Jackie Robinson
Join us for an online event October 8th at 6:30pm

From Brooklyn to Boston, from World War II to the present, Jason Sokol traces the modern history of race and politics in the Northeast. Why did white fans come out to support Jackie Robinson as he broke baseball’s color barrier in 1947 even as Brooklyn’s blacks were shunted into segregated neighborhoods? How was African-American politician Ed Brooke of Massachusetts, who won a Senate seat in 1966, undone by the resistance to desegregation busing in Boston? Is the Northeast’s history a microcosm of America as a whole: outwardly democratic, but inwardly conflicted over race?

We invite you to join us on Zoom on October 8th at 6:30pm for Jason Sokol's presentation: All Eyes Are Upon Us: Racial Struggles in the Northeast, from Jackie Robinson to Deval Patrick. Please sign up to receive a Zoom invite or tune in to the Conway Public Library's Facebook page for a live feed. Contact Lichen  (603-383-9731) if you don't have the skills or equipment to participate, but would like to.